Nightly Song
Musings on Songs that Strike a Chord Tonight

Posts Tagged ‘The Avett Brothers

Rock and Roll by the Velvet Underground

September 16, 2010

Rock and Roll

Performed and written by the Velvet Underground.

Some songs document moments, but the best create moments. So it goes with “Rock and Roll,” the Velvet’s wall of sound coursing through us as if the band plugged not into amps, but directly to us, Moe Tucker’s drum beat becoming our pulse. The song sweeps us up and as an earlier New York author wrote, “Swiftly arose and spread around me the peace and knowledge that pass all the argument of the earth.” It’s not the idea of rock and roll; it is rock and roll.

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Murder in the City – The Avett Brothers

June 8, 2010

Murder in the City

Performed and Written by the Avett Brothers.

“Murder in the City” features another facet of the Avett Brothers – a quiet, ruminative stream with unexpected twists and a performance that can break your heart. Hailing from Concord, North Carolina and playing a host of hardcore, hard-living songs that sound might be called speed country; a change of pace like this ballad can stop you in place. And the subject matter which catch you off guard as well, especially with the title. No violence here, no dark tale of bloodshed, instead, this song turns into a meditation on family and fate. Scott Avett provides the lead vocal while quietly picking at this guitar; brother Seth adds some minimalist piano. The music pushes the lyrics and vocals front and center.

I Killed Sally’s Lover by the Avett Brothers

May 12, 2010

I Killed Sally’s Lover

The Avett Brothers From Live, Vol. II You can hear a live version here, here and here, .

You’re in a beer-soaked, sweaty North Carolina bar, three guys on the stage and wham: One-Two-Three-Four, guitars, banjo and upright base blast off like the amuck off-spring of speed metal and bluegrass, think Appalachian Ramones.

In one breath, we get the whole story: “Somebody get my shot got/Somebody get my blade/Sally’s been laying with another man/And he’s sleeping in my place.” No qualms, no equivocating, the singer relishes the moment, “Gonna shoot him sure as rain/You can run as fast you want to boy/I’ll kill you just the same.” They play with such reckless abandon, such joy. No moaning in a corner over betrayed love, no deep thoughts; it’s a song making lust tangible: “You can try to hide all you want boy/There ain’t nowhere to go.”